Saturday, December 3, 2016

THOSE WHO OPPOSE THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE ARE CRAZY




 
USA Founding fathers in their infinite wisdom created the Electoral College to ensure the STATES were fairly represented. Why should one or two densely populated areas speak for the whole of the nation?
The following list of statistics has been making the rounds on the Internet and it should finally put an end to the argument as to why the Electoral College makes sense.
Share this with as many whiners as you can.
 
 
There are 3,141 counties in the United States.
Trump won 3,084 of them.
Clinton won 57.
There are 62 counties in New York State.
Trump won 46 of them.
Clinton won 16.
Clinton won the popular vote by approx. 1.5 million votes.
In the 5 counties that encompass NYC, (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Richmond & Queens) Clinton received well over 2 million more votes than Trump. (Clinton only won 4 of these counties; Trump won Richmond)
Therefore these 5 counties alone, more than accounted for Clinton winning the popular vote of the entire country.
These 5 counties comprise 319 square miles.
The United States is comprised of 3, 797,000 square miles.
When you have a country that encompasses almost 4 million square miles of territory, it would be ludicrous to even suggest that the vote of those who inhabit a mere 319 square miles should dictate the outcome of a national election.
Large, densely populated Democrat cities (NYC, Chicago, LA, etc) don’t and shouldn’t speak for the rest of our country.
 

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

THE COASTAL ELITES DO NOT KNOW THAT WE EXIST IN THE REST OF AMERICA











THE MEDIA NEEDS TO DO MORE THAN VISIT FLYOVER COUNTRY

The Transom
29 November 16



Les Sillars. http://vlt.tc/2n7c  “Every so often the mainstream media establishment is shocked to find itself guilty of completely misunderstanding the American public, caught napping in an intellectual bubble of its own making. Usually these embarrassments prompt a short-lived round of hand-wringing and little else.

After George W. Bush’s re-election in 2004, some editors assigned reporters to the “conservative beat.” When they misunderstood the rise of the Tea Party in 2010, they promised to get out more often into the hinterlands.
 
“Now some admit they failed to grasp the level of populist rage at elites and especially the news media that led to Donald Trump’s election. One New York Times columnist observed that “it was clear that something was fundamentally broken in journalism.”

Figuring out flyover country will take more than assigning a few reporters because “flyover country isn’t a place, it’s a state of mind.”
 
“Aside from the fact that the phrase “flyover country” reflects the sort of deep condescension that angers so many conservatives in the first place, he is, as tiger/philosopher Hobbes might put it, stumbling toward the perimeter of wisdom.
 
“It’s not just that so many mainstream journalists are out of touch, it’s that so many share foundational beliefs about the nature of God, humanity, and reality—in short, they share a worldview. That’s why sending their current staff into Arkansas once again to interview a couple of yokels and thereby plumb the depths of the red-state American soul just isn’t going to work.
 
“If mainstream editors had some foresight, they would start finding and cultivating journalistic talent who can think outside their bubble. The point would not be to seek out conservatives merely to balance out liberal bias (even if they were prepared to admit bias, and most aren’t). They need journalists with the intellectual firepower—and the will—to recognize and respect the range of reasonable worldviews among their potential readers and viewers. They need reporters who can see society clearly and report on it in a fashion that doesn’t anger half their potential audience.
" 

Ridiculous? Na├»ve? Maybe, but I wish mainstream editors would at least try this approach. It made The New York Times the most respected newspaper in the world for decades. When Tennessee publisher Adolph Ochs, desperate for cash at the time, bought a struggling little paper in 1896, in his first issue he wrote: “It will be my earnest aim that THE NEW-YORK TIMES give the news … impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of party, sect, or interests involved; to make the columns of THE NEW-YORK TIMES a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion.”
 


That Times never quite lived up to Ochs’ ideals, but he did provide a sensible alternative to the obnoxiously sensational “yellow press” or “new journalism” of William Randolph Hearst’s New York Journal and Joseph Pulitzer’s New York World. It took years before the Times became wildly successful (nothing the paper did was all that wild) but he found the journalists who could pull it off.



“The Times set the standard for the modern American journalistic ideal of “objectivity” and outlasted papers that chased readers with what we’d today call click-bait. Twenty-five years later, an admiring editor at another paper wrote that eventually Ochs taught his yellow competitors that “decency meant dollars.”



“Many of my conservative friends will regard me as nuts for suggesting a mainstream news revival might be a good idea. Many conservatives long ago dismissed the networks (outside Fox) and major papers as beyond redemption. Clearly, they seem unlikely to change. They have little incentive to accommodate people who seem to despise them, while years of harsh critiques have hardened them more than prompted serious self-reflection. The nation’s largest newsrooms have not merely blown off conservative criticism, many have doubled down on their liberal bias.
 
“It was a mistake, because their business models depend on speaking to entire communities and even the nation. Once upon a time, so did their rhetoric.”
 
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Sunday, November 6, 2016

DONALD TRUMP AND HILLARY CLINTON WALK INTO A BAR.......


 
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton walk in to a bar.
Donald leans over, and with a smile on his face, says,
“The media is really tearing you apart for that Scandal.”
Hillary: “You mean my lying about Benghazi?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean the massive voter fraud?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean the military not getting their votes counted?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Using my secret private server with classified material to Hide my Activities?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “The NSA monitoring our phone calls, emails and everything Else?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Using the Clinton Foundation as a cover for tax evasion, Hiring Cronies, And taking bribes from foreign countries?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean the drones being operated in our own country without The Benefit of the law?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Giving 123 Technologies $300 Million, and right afterward it Declared Bankruptcy and was sold to the Chinese?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean arming the Muslim Brotherhood and hiring them in the White House?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Whitewater, Watergate committee, Vince Foster, commodity Deals?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “Turning Libya into chaos?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “Being the mastermind of the so-called “Arab Spring” that only brought chaos, death and destruction to the Middle East and North Africa?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “Leaving four Americans to die in Benghazi?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “Trashing Mubarak, one of our few Muslim friends?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “The funding and arming of terrorists in Syria, the destruction and destabilization of that nation, giving the order to our lapdogs in Turkey and Saudi Arabia to give sarin gas to the “moderate” terrorists in Syria that they eventually used on civilians, and framed Assad, and had it not been for the Russians and Putin, we would have used that as a pretext to invade Syria, put a puppet in power, steal their natural resources, and leave that country in total chaos, just like we did with Libya?
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “The creation of the biggest refugees crisis since WWII?”
Trump: “No the other one:”
Hillary: “Leaving Iraq in chaos? ”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “The DOJ spying on the press?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean HHS Secretary Sibelius shaking down health insurance Executives?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Giving our cronies in SOLYNDRA $500 MILLION DOLLARS and 3 Months Later they declared bankruptcy and then the Chinese bought it?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “The NSA monitoring citizens’ ?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “The State Department interfering with an Inspector General Investigation on departmental sexual misconduct?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Me, The IRS, Clapper and Holder all lying to Congress?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Threats to all of Bill’s former mistresses to keep them quiet?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean the INSIDER TRADING of the Tyson chicken deal I did where I invested $1,000 and the next year I got $100,000?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean when Bill met with Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, just before my hearing with the FBI to cut a deal?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: ” You mean the one where my IT guy at Platte River Networks asked Reddit for help to alter emails?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean where the former Haitian Senate President accused me and my foundation of asking him for bribes?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean that old video of me laughing as I explain how I got the charges against that child rapist dropped by blaming the young girl for liking older men and fantasizing about them. Even though I knew the guy was guilty?
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean that video of me coughing up a giant green lunger into my drinking glass then drinking it back down?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean that video of me passing out on the curb and losing my shoe?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean when I robbed Bernie Sanders of the Democratic Party Nomination by having the DNC rig the nomination process so that I would win?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “You mean how so many people that oppose me have died in mysterious was?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “Travel Gate? When seven employees of the White House Travel Office were fired so that friends of Bill and mine could take over the travel business? And when I lied under oath during the investigation by the FBI, the Department of Justice, the White House itself, the General Accounting Office, the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee, and the Whitewater Independent Counsel?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “The scandal where, (while I was Secretary if State), the State Department signed off on a deal to sell 20% of the USA’s uranium to a Canadian corporation that the Russians bought, netting a $145 million donation from Russia to the Clinton Foundation and a $500,000 speaking gig for Bill from the Russian Investment Bank that set up the corporate buyout?. That scandal?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “That time I lied when I said I was under sniper fire when I got off the plane in Bosnia?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “That time when after I became the First Lady, I improperly requested a bunch of FBI files so I could look for blackmail material on government insiders?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “That time when Bill nominated Zoe Baird as Attorney General, even though we knew she hired illegal immigrants and didn’t pay payroll taxes on them?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “When I got Nigeria exempted from foreign aid transparency guidelines despite evidence of corruption because they gave Bill a $700,000 in speaking fees?”
Trump” “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “That time in 2009 when Honduran military forces allied with rightist lawmakers ousted democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya, and I as then-Secretary of State sided with the armed forces and fought global pressure to reinstate him?”
Trump: “No, the other one.”
Hillary: “I give up! … Oh wait, I think I’ve got it! When I stole the White House furniture, silverware, when Bill left Office?”
Trump: “THAT’S IT! I almost forgot about that one”.

TAKE A GOOD LONG LOOK AT TIM KAINE IF YOU LOVE AMERICA


 Vote for Hillary and get this guy too!  Worse yet, he is in line to be President if something happens to Hillary!  Amazing she could select this guy as her VP.. isn't it.. 
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This man is a bad, bad, bad guy masquerading as a "Catholic".  Breitbart has reported that Clinton?s V.P.  pick Tim Kaine is among the top anti-Israel senators.  He is the top recipient of PAC funds from George Soros's anti-Israel group, J Street.  He distinguished himself as one of eight senators to walk out on Benjamin Netanyahu's historic speech to a joint session of Congress warning against the Iran nuclear deal.  Kaine's record on the Islamic threat here in America is far, far worse than that.

In exchange for campaign contributions, he appointed a radical jihadi to the Virginia Immigration Commission.  Esam Omeish runs a group described by federal prosecutors in a 2008 court filing "as the overt arm of the Muslim Brotherhood in America." Omeish is the V.P.  of a radical mosque that had the al-Qaeda operative Anwar Al-Awlaki as its imam and two of the 9/11 hijackers and Nidal Hasan, the perpetrator of the Fort Hood shooting, in the congregation.  Omeish is still a board member, even as he serves on the Virginia Immigration Commission.  Omeish was also chairman of the board of a New Jersey mosque with terrorist ties, including an imam whom the Department of Homeland Security wants to deport for having links to Hamas.  As if that weren't enough, Omeish pledged in a video to help Palestinians who understand that "the jihad way is the way to liberate your land."

When a state delegate wrote a letter to then-Governor Kaine warning him that the MAS has "questionable origins, "a Kaine spokesperson said the charge was bigotry.  Kaine also has close ties with Jamal Barzinji, whom the Global Muslim Brotherhood Watch describes as a ?founding father of the U.S.  Muslim Brotherhood.?

He first came on to the FBI's radar in 1987-1988 when an informant inside the Brotherhood identified Barzinji and his associated groups as being part of a network of Brotherhood fronts to "institute the Islamic Revolution in the United States."

The source said Barzinji and his colleagues were "organizing political support which involves influencing both public opinion in the United States as well as the United States Government using "political action front groups with no traceable ties."

(snip) Barzinji was nearly prosecuted but the Obama Justice Department dropped plans for indictment.

Barzinji played a major role in nearly every Brotherhood front in the U.S.  and was vice president of the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), which came under terrorism investigation also.

What is truly chilling about Kaine's association with known terrorists is that the indictment of Al-Arian says the jihadist's strategy was to "seek to obtain support from influential individuals, in the United States under the guise of promoting and protecting Arab rights."

The quotes about Brotherhood operative Barzinji's aspirations to use civil rights advocacy as a means to influence politicians are especially relevant when you consider that video from the event honoring Barzinji shows Kaine saying that it was his fourth time at the annual dinner and thanked his ?friends?  that organized it for helping him in his campaign for lieutenant-governor and governor and asked them to help his Senate campaign.

Like Hillary, Tim Kaine's affection for jihadists is a quid pro quo: he gives them cover and appointments to positions of power, and they give him money.

(snip) The Barzinji-tied New Dominion PAC donated $43,050 to Kaine's gubernatorial campaign.

The PAC has very strong ties to the Democratic Party in Virginia, with almost $257,000 in donations.  This likely explains why Barzinji's grandson served in Governor McAuliffe's administration and then became the Obama Administration's liaison to the Muslim-American community.

The Middle East Forum's Islamist Money in Politics database shows another $4,300 donated to Kaine's Senate campaign in 2011-2012 by officials from U.S.  Muslim Brotherhood entities.  Another $3,500 came from Barzinjis IIIT organization.

The New York Sun sees Kaine as one of the few senators who fully backed the Obama-Hillary Middle East disaster, including the open disrespect and hostility to our ally, Israel.

Can it be a coincidence that of all the millions of Americans Secretary Clinton could have picked as her running mate, she chose, in Senator Kaine, one of the eight Democrats who boycotted Prime Minister Netanyahu's address last year to a joint meeting of Congress.  Not a chance.  It's one marker of the fact that for all Mrs.  Clinton's protestations of support for the Jewish State, it would be a fool's wager to count on her when the chips are down.

Hillary's choice of Tim Kaine reveals her intentions as president to continue the Obama policy of promoting the Muslim Brotherhood and Iran and betraying Israel.  The choice of Kaine also reveals Hillary's reckless disregard for homeland security.  She has chosen a man who is willing to cozy up to well-known terror-promoters here in America in exchange for cash.

The media wants us to think Donald Trump is dangerous.  This is the face of danger: Clinton-Kaine, importers of jihadi terror to America.
 

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

WHAT WILL THE GOP LOOK LIKE WITHOUT TRUMP, IF HE LOSES ???



THE FUTURE OF POPULISM WITHOUT TRUMP:

In the latest Commentary podcast, John Podhoretz singles me out a bit, starting around the 50 minute mark: http://vlt.tc/2lco  I had it transcribed for Transom purposes (stripping out some comments from Noah Rothman and Abe Greenwald to focus on John’s point): “There is this line that Ben Domenech of The Federalist said last week: "Trump will lose and then nothing will change. Things need to change but nothing will change." Well what exactly is it that's supposed to change? Again, we don't know what the margin is. But if he's at 40% and Hillary's at 51% or he's at 39% and Hillary's at 52% or something like that, let's just say. What part of his agenda wasn't rejected by the overwhelming majority of the American people?

“That's what happens. That is wilderness for a generation. Now it doesn't mean that the Republican Party won't do down this path. McGovern lost by almost 24 points in 1972 and the Party effectively became a McGovernite Party for almost 20 years afterwards, even though he had lost... The public made it clear, they didn't like how he talked about foreign policy, they didn't like how he talked about crime, they didn't like how he talked about taxes, they didn't like his embrace of the new left, and they didn't like the basic anti-Americanism of the approach…

“More important in all of this is this notion that populists who are nonetheless disgusted by Trump, they want to embrace the populism of Trump without Trump, like Ben Domenech and others, will not tell you what part of the Trump agenda it is that they think we need to hold on to. Let them say. I would like to know. Is a Muslim ban something that they like? I mean fine, so maybe the Republican Party will be talking about a wall for the next 50 years, whatever. Do they want trade wars? It's like, "Yes, well you know we haven't really looked at this, if in fact yes American makes ..." Do we want a trade war with China or not? …

“We're having a definitional problem here, because Republican Reformers ordinarily refers to people like Paul Ryan and stuff like that. Who it is the argument of this group of non-Trump but not anti-anti-Trump, anti-anti-anti-anti-Trump people, like Ben Domenech ... They're not really the Reform Republicans as the term ...

“The Reform Republicans are first the people who very honestly and with good hearts beginning in 2006 said look, there's a whole bunch of people who are being left behind in our economy. We need to structure ways to speak to them. That was Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam's book, "Sam's Club Republicans", which emerged from an article in the Weekly Standard. We've published Yuval Levin on the mobility crisis and Paul Ryan's budgets and now his Better Way agenda. These are all efforts. These are all very conscious, very meaningful efforts to attempt to cope with the fact that there are people who have been left behind and that policies can be used to structure to help them…

“They didn't work. But it didn't work. It's been 10 years and it didn't work. I wish it worked. Look, I believe in that. I believe in many of the agenda items that are part – it didn't work as an electoral selling agenda. Effectively both Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio ran as these Reform Republicans…

“That's the nonsense, because if you were to say ‘well we need Trumpism without Trump,’ meaning figure out some way to speak to and reintegrate the white working class into the fabric of the United States as it appears to be disweaving itself from it, the only agenda that exists is the reform agenda. And that's Paul Ryan and ‘He's bad and he's just going to be a blank check for Hillary Clinton.’ …

“Anyway, the whole point here is that it's not true. Trump is not their tribune. It would not work to the tribune of the white working class to inaugurate a trade war with China, which would end up raising prices at every store in America by 25% which is something that's really helpful to people who are living, if they're even living paycheck to paycheck. It is not helpful, none of this is helpful.

“Trump is about something else. It is a cultural message about feeling left behind, about rage, and about an honest feeling that the culture is galloping in a direction in which the country is being reshaped without input from a lot of the self-governed Americans.”

So let’s circle back to the key portion of this: “More important in all of this is this notion that populists who are nonetheless disgusted by Trump, they want to embrace the populism of Trump without Trump, like Ben Domenech and others, will not tell you what part of the Trump agenda it is that they think we need to hold on to. Let them say. I would like to know.”

Now, I’ll grant you this cycle has been very busy, but in my memory I don’t recall being asked this question by JPod or anyone else. Because if he asked, I'd certainly have answered it!

First, I’ll admit I don’t understand the overall point about reform. JPod talks about an attempt to reform tied to Paul Ryan and beginning in 2006 (aside: I don’t imagine most would consider Ryan as the leader of the reformists, but no matter). JPod says the only viable reform path is this one, but then he says that after ten years of trying this message has failed, that it failed with Bush and Rubio this time around.

The idea here that Ryan’s approach, the Better Way approach, represents the only viable avenue of reform – “the only agenda that exists is the reform agenda” – seems odd. Is Theresa May's mic not working? Of course there can’t be Trumpism without Trump. But this doesn't mean there can't be populism without Trump. Every other western democracy seems to be trying to meet that market demand. Why can't we do it here? There's no way to incorporate the popular (or even good?) ideas and approach of Trump but not do it with a heathen buffoon with the tastes of Caligula?

For the past couple of months on our radio show I’ve been saying that I think the essential element conservatives ought to retain from Trump is actually not a matter of agenda, but of tone and attitude: the adoption of a default posture of rejection of elite/media assumptions, which some call political incorrectness and others call “telling it like it is”. Trump’s supporters aren’t going to be won over by any twists of a knob in an improved technocratic agenda. Policy details are less important than that essential attitude which reads as belligerent toughness toward our national elite. When people say Trump “tells it like it is”, they don't mean he is actually being honest and telling the truth. They mean he is someone who doesn't appear to couch every word so as to minimize too-easily-taken offense in our wussified culture. They mean he is not afraid of offending.

As for the agenda, I'd start with the premise that somewhat popular minority views can be massaged into something that can fly with a majority. I think history proves this is possible. But when you do that, it shouldn't require that someone be a domestic liberal/international erratic like Trump. Ideally it's an agenda you could run on if you're a Tom Cotton type, too, and I expect potential candidates next cycle to try.

Why can't a Republican Senate candidate in Virginia next year run on an agenda that includes: Building the wall, making our NATO allies pay their fair share, banning Syrian refugees, tracking and enforcing VISA overstays, higher penalties for shooting cops, a 5 year lobbying ban on everybody, cutting the payroll tax for everyone, downplaying entitlement reform, saying marijuana is a state by state issue, and backing term limits - all populist things most of which Trump has supported and none of which are far out of the bounds of conservative orthodoxy?

A more populist agenda would be helpful to winning over Trump supporters, but it is less important than the attitude. The point I keep hammering away on in "MEETINGS ABOUT THE FUTURE" and the like is that the number one aspect of Donald Trump conservatives should retain is an inherent inclination against accepting elite premises about what is acceptable. Thus, something like his call for the Syrian refugee ban – denounced as vile and inhuman by our media and political elites, who know no one who disagrees with them on it – turns out to be popular with an actual majority of Americans! Why? Not just because for many Americans it's just common sense (“how can the government which can’t run a VA, launch a website, or keep track of a terrorist’s wife tell good refugees from bad?”) but also because it's offensive to everyone sitting around the table on TV. We should recognize that the only entity less popular than Congress is the media and treat them as such.

---

Sunday, October 16, 2016

REPUBLICANS ACT LIKE FOOLS AT TIMES


Photo of Senator Ted Cruz calling out Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for lying to the Republican members of the Senate.
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All during the 2016 primary season I warned that the Dems wanted Trump to win the nomination rather than Cruz.  One of the reasons was because Cruz was a world champion debater and Hillary would not stand a chance against Cruz in debates.

So the Dems played it smart and withheld all of their damaging tapes against Trump and are only releasing them now just days before the November 8 election.  That way they made it easier for Trump to defeat Cruz for the nomination.

Republican leadership is incompetent, beginning with the leadership in Congress that could not forgive Cruz for calling Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell a "liar" when it was on the public record that the had lied to the Republican members of the Senate.

Then, the leadership of the RNC is incompetent, beginning with the Chairman, Priebus!!! 
Because he prevented the delegates at the Republican Covention from voting on the motion to free the delegates from their pledge to vote at the convention for the man whose name was on the ballot in the primaries.

Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind !!!!!!!!!!!

TED CRUZ EXPRESSES THE THOUGHT I HAD ALL DURING THE 2015 PRIMARIES: THE DEMOCRATS WANTED TRUMP TO WIN THE NOMINATION !!!

Ted Cruz Indicts the Entire Media Over Trump's Lewd Video with One Damning Question


Ted Cruz
Getty - Andrew Burton
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 The Wildfire is an opinion platform and any opinions or information put forth by contributors are exclusive to them and do not represent the views of IJR.
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Ted Cruz might not have won the GOP presidential nomination, but during Sunday night's debate, the Texas senator proved he was very much 'still in the race.'
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With one incriminating question, Cruz exposed — as has been exposed countless times in the past — the blatant bias of the so-called 'mainstream' media.
That question was about the timing of the release of the 'leaked' video:

"Given that the liberal media now works 24/7 to dig up dirt on Trump, why not release the video as soon as he announced his candidacy in June of 2015?"

Excellent question. 

Wait — I think I figured it out.

You don't suppose the liberal media wanted Trump to win the nomination, do you, thinking Hillary would have a better shot against him than any of the other candidates?

Yeah, me too.

The “Apprentice” producer to whom Cruz refers is Bill Pruitt, who tweeted the following ominous message the day after the leaked video was released:

If NBC had “far worse” video of Trump years ago, why did the network sit on it? Seems there's only one or two answers — neither of which demonstrates integrity.

It was either because “The Apprentice” was a 'cash cow' for NBC at the time, or execs thought the video might just come in handy sometime down the road.

In any case, well played, Sen. Cruz.

Saturday, October 15, 2016

HILLARY CLINTON PROBABLY SUFFERS FROM PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY AND IS UNFIT TO BE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES


Screenshot from Video of Hillary Clinton suffering apparent stroke on camera. Our link to the video is below; click on the photo in the lower right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMHOcmDVBP0


What is progressive supranuclear palsy?

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an uncommon brain disorder that affects movement, control of walking (gait) and balance, speech, swallowing, vision, mood and behavior, and thinking. The disease results from damage to nerve cells in the brain. The disorder’s long name indicates that the disease worsens (progressive) and causes weakness (palsy) by damaging certain parts of the brain above nerve cell clusters called nuclei (supranuclear). These nuclei particularly control eye movements. One of the classic signs of the disease is an inability to aim and move the eyes properly, which individuals may experience as blurring of vision.
Estimates vary, but only about three to six in every 100,000 people worldwide, or approximately 20,000 Americans, have PSP—making it much less common than Parkinson's disease (another movement disorder in which an estimated 50,000 Americans are diagnosed each year). Symptoms of PSP begin on average after age 60, but may occur earlier. Men are affected more often than women.
PSP was first described as a distinct disorder in 1964, when three scientists published a paper that distinguished the condition from Parkinson's disease. It was sometimes referred to as Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, reflecting the combined names of the scientists who defined the disorder.
Currently there is no effective treatment for PSP, but some symptoms can be managed with medication or other interventions.

What are the symptoms?

The pattern of signs and symptoms can be quite different from person to person. The most frequent first symptom of PSP is a loss of balance while walking. Individuals may have unexplained falls or a stiffness and awkwardness in gait.
As the disease progresses, most people will begin to develop a blurring of vision and problems controlling eye movement. In fact, eye problems, in particular slowness of eye movements, usually offer the first definitive clue that PSP is the proper diagnosis. Individuals affected by PSP especially have trouble voluntarily shifting their gaze vertically (i.e., downward and/or upward) and also can have trouble controlling their eyelids. This can lead to a need to move the head to look in different directions, involuntary closing of the eyes, prolonged or infrequent blinking, or difficulty in opening the eyes. Another common visual problem is an inability to maintain eye contact during a conversation. This can give the mistaken impression that the person is hostile or uninterested.
People with PSP often show alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy.  Some show changes in judgment, insight, and problem solving, and may have difficulty finding words. They may lose interest in ordinary pleasurable activities or show increased irritability and forgetfulness. Individuals may suddenly laugh or cry for no apparent reason, they may be apathetic, or they may have occasional angry outbursts, also for no apparent reason. Speech usually becomes slower and slurred and swallowing solid foods or liquids can be difficult. Other symptoms include slowed movement, monotone speech, and a mask-like facial expression.  Since many symptoms of PSP are also seen in individuals with Parkinson’s disease, particularly early in the disorder, PSP is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease..

How is PSP different from Parkinson's disease?

Both PSP and Parkinson's disease cause stiffness, movement difficulties, and clumsiness, but PSP is more rapidly progressive as compared to Parkinson’s disease. People with PSP usually stand exceptionally straight or occasionally even tilt their heads backward (and tend to fall backward). This is termed “axial rigidity.” Those with Parkinson's disease usually bend forward. Problems with speech and swallowing are much more common and severe in PSP than in Parkinson's disease, and tend to show up earlier in the course of the disease. Eye movements are abnormal in PSP but close to normal in Parkinson's disease. Both diseases share other features: onset in late middle age, bradykinesia (slow movement), and rigidity of muscles. Tremor, very common in individuals with Parkinson's disease, is rare in PSP. Although individuals with Parkinson's disease markedly benefit from the drug levodopa, people with PSP respond minimally and only briefly to this drug. Also, people with PSP show accumulation of the protein tau in affected brain cells, while people with Parkinson’s disease show accumulation of a different protein, called alpha-synuclein.

What causes PSP?

The exact cause of PSP is unknown. The symptoms of PSP are caused by a gradual deterioration of brain cells in a few specific areas in the brain, mainly in the region called the brain stem. One of these areas, the substantia nigra, is also affected in Parkinson's disease, and damage to this region of the brain accounts in part for the motor symptoms that PSP and Parkinson's have in common.
The hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of abnormal deposits of the protein tau in nerve cells in the brain, so that the cells do not work properly and die. The protein tau is associated with microtubules – structures that support a nerve cell’s long processes, or axons, that transmit information to other nerve cells. The accumulation of tau puts PSP in the group of disorders called the tauopathies, which also includes other disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, corticobasal degeneration, and some forms of frontotemporal degeneration. Scientists are looking at ways to prevent the harmful clumping of tau in treating each of these disorders.
PSP is usually sporadic, meaning that occurs infrequently and without known cause; in very few cases the disease results from mutations in the MAPT gene, which then provides faulty instructions for making tau to the nerve cell. Genetic factors have not been implicated in most individuals.
There are several theories about PSP's cause. A central hypothesis in many neurodegenerative diseases is that once the abnormal aggregates of proteins like tau form in a cell, they can affect a connected cell to also form the protein clumps. In this way the toxic protein aggregates spreads through the nervous system. How this process is triggered remains unknown. One possibility is that an unconventional infectious agent takes years or decades to start producing visible effects (as is seen in disorders like Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease). Another possibility is that random genetic mutations, of the kind that occur in all of us all the time, happen to occur in particular cells or certain genes, in just the right combination to injure these cells. A third possibility is that there is exposure to some unknown chemical in the food, air, or water which slowly damages certain vulnerable areas of the brain. This theory stems from a clue found on the Pacific island of Guam, where a common neurological disease occurring only there and on a few neighboring islands shares some of the characteristics of PSP, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its cause is thought to be a dietary factor or toxic substance found only in that area.
Another possible cause of PSP is cellular damage caused by free radicals, which are reactive molecules produced continuously by all cells during normal metabolism. Although the body has built-in mechanisms for clearing free radicals from the system, scientists suspect that, under certain circumstances, free radicals can react with and damage other molecules. A great deal of research is directed at understanding the role of free radical damage in human diseases.

How is PSP diagnosed?

No specific laboratory tests or imaging approaches currently exist to definitively diagnose PSP.  The disease is often difficult to diagnose because its symptoms can be very much like those of other movement disorders, and because some of the most characteristic symptoms may develop late or not at all. Initial complaints in PSP are typically vague and fall into these categories: 1) symptoms of disequilibrium, such as unsteady walking or abrupt and unexplained falls without loss of consciousness; 2) visual complaints, including blurred vision, difficulties in looking up or down, double vision, light sensitivity, burning eyes, or other eye trouble; 3) slurred speech; and 4) various mental complaints such as slowness of thought, impaired memory, personality changes, and changes in mood. An initial diagnosis is based on the person’s medical history and a physical and neurological exam. Diagnostic scans such as magnetic resonance imaging may show shrinkage at the top of the brain stem. Other imaging tests can look at brain activity in known areas of degeneration.
PSP is often misdiagnosed because it is relatively rare and some of its symptoms are very much like those of Parkinson's disease. Memory problems and personality changes may also lead a physician to mistake PSP for depression, or even attribute symptoms to some form of dementia. The key to diagnosing PSP is identifying early gait instability and difficulty moving the eyes, speech and swallow abnormalities, as well as ruling out other similar disorders, some of which are treatable.

Is there any treatment?

There is currently no effective treatment for PSP, although scientists are searching for better ways to manage the disease. PSP symptoms usually do not respond to medications. Drugs prescribed to treat Parkinson’s disease, such as ropinirole, rarely provide additional benefit. In some individuals the slowness, stiffness, and balance problems of PSP may respond to some degree to antiparkinsonian agents such as levodopa, but the effect is usually minimal and short-lasting. Excessive eye closing can be treated with botulinum injections. Some antidepressant drugs may provide benefit beyond treating depression, such as pain relief and decreasing drooling.
Recent approaches to therapeutic development for PSP have focused primarily on the clearance of abnormally accumulated tau in the brain. One ongoing clinical trial will determine the safety and tolerability of a compound that prevents accumulation of tau in preclinical models. Other studies are exploring improved tau imaging agents that will be used to assess disease progression and improvement in response to treatment.
Non-drug treatment for PSP can take many forms. Individuals frequently use weighted walking aids because of their tendency to fall backward. Bifocals or special glasses called prisms are sometimes prescribed for people with PSP to remedy the difficulty of looking down. Formal physical therapy is of no proven benefit in PSP, but certain exercises can be done to keep the joints limber.
A gastrostomy (a minimally invasive surgical procedure that involves the placement of a tube through the skin of the abdomen into the stomach for feeding purposes) may be necessary when there are swallowing disturbances or the definite risk of severe choking. Deep brain stimulation (which uses a surgically implanted electrode and pulse generator to stimulate the brain in a way that helps to block signals that cause many of the motor symptoms) and other surgical procedures used in individuals with Parkinson's disease have not been proven effective in PSP.

What is the prognosis?

The disease gets progressively worse, with people becoming severely disabled within three to five years of onset. Affected individuals are predisposed to serious complications such as pneumonia, choking, head injury, and fractures. The most common cause of death is pneumonia. With good attention to medical and nutritional needs, it is possible for individuals with PSP to live a decade or more after the first symptoms of the disease.

HILLARY CLINTON PROBABLY SUFFERS FROM PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY AND IN UNFIT TO BE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Screenshot from Video of Hillary Clinton suffering apparent stroke on camera. Our link to the video is below; click on the photo in the lower right.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMHOcmDVBP0


What is progressive supranuclear palsy?

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is an uncommon brain disorder that affects movement, control of walking (gait) and balance, speech, swallowing, vision, mood and behavior, and thinking. The disease results from damage to nerve cells in the brain. The disorder’s long name indicates that the disease worsens (progressive) and causes weakness (palsy) by damaging certain parts of the brain above nerve cell clusters called nuclei (supranuclear). These nuclei particularly control eye movements. One of the classic signs of the disease is an inability to aim and move the eyes properly, which individuals may experience as blurring of vision.
Estimates vary, but only about three to six in every 100,000 people worldwide, or approximately 20,000 Americans, have PSP—making it much less common than Parkinson's disease (another movement disorder in which an estimated 50,000 Americans are diagnosed each year). Symptoms of PSP begin on average after age 60, but may occur earlier. Men are affected more often than women.
PSP was first described as a distinct disorder in 1964, when three scientists published a paper that distinguished the condition from Parkinson's disease. It was sometimes referred to as Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, reflecting the combined names of the scientists who defined the disorder.
Currently there is no effective treatment for PSP, but some symptoms can be managed with medication or other interventions.

What are the symptoms?

The pattern of signs and symptoms can be quite different from person to person. The most frequent first symptom of PSP is a loss of balance while walking. Individuals may have unexplained falls or a stiffness and awkwardness in gait.
As the disease progresses, most people will begin to develop a blurring of vision and problems controlling eye movement. In fact, eye problems, in particular slowness of eye movements, usually offer the first definitive clue that PSP is the proper diagnosis. Individuals affected by PSP especially have trouble voluntarily shifting their gaze vertically (i.e., downward and/or upward) and also can have trouble controlling their eyelids. This can lead to a need to move the head to look in different directions, involuntary closing of the eyes, prolonged or infrequent blinking, or difficulty in opening the eyes. Another common visual problem is an inability to maintain eye contact during a conversation. This can give the mistaken impression that the person is hostile or uninterested.
People with PSP often show alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy.  Some show changes in judgment, insight, and problem solving, and may have difficulty finding words. They may lose interest in ordinary pleasurable activities or show increased irritability and forgetfulness. Individuals may suddenly laugh or cry for no apparent reason, they may be apathetic, or they may have occasional angry outbursts, also for no apparent reason. Speech usually becomes slower and slurred and swallowing solid foods or liquids can be difficult. Other symptoms include slowed movement, monotone speech, and a mask-like facial expression.  Since many symptoms of PSP are also seen in individuals with Parkinson’s disease, particularly early in the disorder, PSP is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease..

How is PSP different from Parkinson's disease?

Both PSP and Parkinson's disease cause stiffness, movement difficulties, and clumsiness, but PSP is more rapidly progressive as compared to Parkinson’s disease. People with PSP usually stand exceptionally straight or occasionally even tilt their heads backward (and tend to fall backward). This is termed “axial rigidity.” Those with Parkinson's disease usually bend forward. Problems with speech and swallowing are much more common and severe in PSP than in Parkinson's disease, and tend to show up earlier in the course of the disease. Eye movements are abnormal in PSP but close to normal in Parkinson's disease. Both diseases share other features: onset in late middle age, bradykinesia (slow movement), and rigidity of muscles. Tremor, very common in individuals with Parkinson's disease, is rare in PSP. Although individuals with Parkinson's disease markedly benefit from the drug levodopa, people with PSP respond minimally and only briefly to this drug. Also, people with PSP show accumulation of the protein tau in affected brain cells, while people with Parkinson’s disease show accumulation of a different protein, called alpha-synuclein.

What causes PSP?

The exact cause of PSP is unknown. The symptoms of PSP are caused by a gradual deterioration of brain cells in a few specific areas in the brain, mainly in the region called the brain stem. One of these areas, the substantia nigra, is also affected in Parkinson's disease, and damage to this region of the brain accounts in part for the motor symptoms that PSP and Parkinson's have in common.
The hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of abnormal deposits of the protein tau in nerve cells in the brain, so that the cells do not work properly and die. The protein tau is associated with microtubules – structures that support a nerve cell’s long processes, or axons, that transmit information to other nerve cells. The accumulation of tau puts PSP in the group of disorders called the tauopathies, which also includes other disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, corticobasal degeneration, and some forms of frontotemporal degeneration. Scientists are looking at ways to prevent the harmful clumping of tau in treating each of these disorders.
PSP is usually sporadic, meaning that occurs infrequently and without known cause; in very few cases the disease results from mutations in the MAPT gene, which then provides faulty instructions for making tau to the nerve cell. Genetic factors have not been implicated in most individuals.
There are several theories about PSP's cause. A central hypothesis in many neurodegenerative diseases is that once the abnormal aggregates of proteins like tau form in a cell, they can affect a connected cell to also form the protein clumps. In this way the toxic protein aggregates spreads through the nervous system. How this process is triggered remains unknown. One possibility is that an unconventional infectious agent takes years or decades to start producing visible effects (as is seen in disorders like Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease). Another possibility is that random genetic mutations, of the kind that occur in all of us all the time, happen to occur in particular cells or certain genes, in just the right combination to injure these cells. A third possibility is that there is exposure to some unknown chemical in the food, air, or water which slowly damages certain vulnerable areas of the brain. This theory stems from a clue found on the Pacific island of Guam, where a common neurological disease occurring only there and on a few neighboring islands shares some of the characteristics of PSP, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its cause is thought to be a dietary factor or toxic substance found only in that area.
Another possible cause of PSP is cellular damage caused by free radicals, which are reactive molecules produced continuously by all cells during normal metabolism. Although the body has built-in mechanisms for clearing free radicals from the system, scientists suspect that, under certain circumstances, free radicals can react with and damage other molecules. A great deal of research is directed at understanding the role of free radical damage in human diseases.

How is PSP diagnosed?

No specific laboratory tests or imaging approaches currently exist to definitively diagnose PSP.  The disease is often difficult to diagnose because its symptoms can be very much like those of other movement disorders, and because some of the most characteristic symptoms may develop late or not at all. Initial complaints in PSP are typically vague and fall into these categories: 1) symptoms of disequilibrium, such as unsteady walking or abrupt and unexplained falls without loss of consciousness; 2) visual complaints, including blurred vision, difficulties in looking up or down, double vision, light sensitivity, burning eyes, or other eye trouble; 3) slurred speech; and 4) various mental complaints such as slowness of thought, impaired memory, personality changes, and changes in mood. An initial diagnosis is based on the person’s medical history and a physical and neurological exam. Diagnostic scans such as magnetic resonance imaging may show shrinkage at the top of the brain stem. Other imaging tests can look at brain activity in known areas of degeneration.
PSP is often misdiagnosed because it is relatively rare and some of its symptoms are very much like those of Parkinson's disease. Memory problems and personality changes may also lead a physician to mistake PSP for depression, or even attribute symptoms to some form of dementia. The key to diagnosing PSP is identifying early gait instability and difficulty moving the eyes, speech and swallow abnormalities, as well as ruling out other similar disorders, some of which are treatable.

Is there any treatment?

There is currently no effective treatment for PSP, although scientists are searching for better ways to manage the disease. PSP symptoms usually do not respond to medications. Drugs prescribed to treat Parkinson’s disease, such as ropinirole, rarely provide additional benefit. In some individuals the slowness, stiffness, and balance problems of PSP may respond to some degree to antiparkinsonian agents such as levodopa, but the effect is usually minimal and short-lasting. Excessive eye closing can be treated with botulinum injections. Some antidepressant drugs may provide benefit beyond treating depression, such as pain relief and decreasing drooling.
Recent approaches to therapeutic development for PSP have focused primarily on the clearance of abnormally accumulated tau in the brain. One ongoing clinical trial will determine the safety and tolerability of a compound that prevents accumulation of tau in preclinical models. Other studies are exploring improved tau imaging agents that will be used to assess disease progression and improvement in response to treatment.
Non-drug treatment for PSP can take many forms. Individuals frequently use weighted walking aids because of their tendency to fall backward. Bifocals or special glasses called prisms are sometimes prescribed for people with PSP to remedy the difficulty of looking down. Formal physical therapy is of no proven benefit in PSP, but certain exercises can be done to keep the joints limber.
A gastrostomy (a minimally invasive surgical procedure that involves the placement of a tube through the skin of the abdomen into the stomach for feeding purposes) may be necessary when there are swallowing disturbances or the definite risk of severe choking. Deep brain stimulation (which uses a surgically implanted electrode and pulse generator to stimulate the brain in a way that helps to block signals that cause many of the motor symptoms) and other surgical procedures used in individuals with Parkinson's disease have not been proven effective in PSP.

What is the prognosis?

The disease gets progressively worse, with people becoming severely disabled within three to five years of onset. Affected individuals are predisposed to serious complications such as pneumonia, choking, head injury, and fractures. The most common cause of death is pneumonia. With good attention to medical and nutritional needs, it is possible for individuals with PSP to live a decade or more after the first symptoms of the disease.